Cyberwarfare / Nation-State Attacks , Fraud Management & Cybercrime , Video

Why Hacktivists Got Bored With the Russia-Ukraine Cyberwar

Also: BEC Scam Trends and a Cuban Ransomware Group's Strike in Montenegro
Clockwise, from top left: Anna Delaney, Tony Morbin, Tom Field and Mathew Schwartz

In the latest weekly update, four Information Security Media Group editors discuss key cybersecurity issues, including the high cost of BEC scams, a Cuba ransomware gang's attack on Montenegro, and why so many hacktivists couldn't overcome the technical ennui of the Russia-Ukraine cyberwar and dropped out after a few months.

See Also: Live Webinar | How To Meet Your Zero Trust Goals Through Advanced Endpoint Strategies

The panelists - Anna Delaney, director, productions; Tony Morbin, executive news editor, EU; Tom Field, senior vice president, editorial; and Mathew Schwartz, executive editor, DataBreachToday & Europe - discuss:

  • Highlights from an interview with Secret Service agents Stephen Dougherty and Michael Johns on how business email compromise has cost enterprises more than $43 billion since 2016;
  • How a Cuba ransomware gang is taking credit for a "targeted cyberattack" against the government of Montenegro, knocking multiple government websites and services offline;
  • How according to a team of researchers, the role and impact of criminal hackers and hacktivists in the Russia-Ukraine war has been vastly overestimated, with many volunteers dropping out after just a few months.

The ISMG Editors' Panel runs weekly. Don't miss our previous installments, including the Aug. 19 edition discussing how the plot thickens for crypto mixer Tornado Cash and the Aug. 26 edition discussing the implications of the Russia-Ukraine hybrid war.


About the Author

Anna Delaney

Anna Delaney

Director, ISMG Productions

An experienced broadcast journalist, Delaney conducts interviews with senior cybersecurity leaders around the world. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of the website for The European Information Security Summit, or TEISS. Earlier, she worked at Levant TV and Resonance FM and served as a researcher at the BBC and ITV in their documentary and factual TV departments.




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